Why it’s a good thing that your website isn’t popular.

no viewsUnless if you’re already rich and famous, every aspiring platform-builder starts out at the same spot. Although it might be discouraging to get little to no attention (traffic) for your hard work, I believe that it is actually a good thing, as I see platform building as a long, gradual learning process.
  • I just started running about a month ago. I am already up to 4 miles, but can I run a marathon yet? Definitely not. If I tried running a marathon now, I would fail miserably, likely on the side of the road throwing up.
  • I just started lifting weights a month ago. Can I instantly bench press twice my body weight? Absolutely not – the weight would fall onto my chest and I’d get injured. I simply do not have the muscle required.
  • Although I know how to toss around a squishy foam football, imagine getting thrown into a NFL American football game. I would break every bone in my body, while looking pathetic.
  • For fellow gamers: If I just start playing World of Warcraft, and purchase power-leveling for people to level my character for me to the level cap, would I be able to participate in end-game dungeon raids? Nope, I would have no idea how to properly control my character, and would get kicked out of any guild I manage to cheat my way into.
Running a website isn’t any different from these scenarios. If you are new to platform-building and your website immediately started getting hundreds of thousands of unique visitors monthly, you would quickly become overwhelmed.
I was “lucky” enough to create something that gets over a million unique visitors a month. It has been featured in the press numerous times, including several newspapers, radio talk shows, national magazines, and network television in multiple countries. But guess what, I think that it totally sucks that it became this popular. I just wasn’t ready for it. My website was simply not built to handle the current popularity that it generates.
Here are some of the things that I have experienced because I haven’t established a true platform, despite owning a very popular website:
  • While trying to generate content for the site, I get bombarded with these inquires of all types, over 100 every day… media requests, users having technical troubles, people reaching out for personal advice, etc. It all becomes very overwhelming.
  • The site cost me over $14,000 out of pocket in the past year. It isn’t properly monetized to be sustainable.
  • I work on it over 40 hours a week, in addition to my 40-hour-per-week full-time career.
  • I feel somewhat controlled by my user-base. Instead of steering my ship, I seem to be caught up in the strong currents of their desires. I feel like I have lost some creative control over my website.
  • I constantly burn out. It is very stressful, having everything resting on your shoulders instead of having a proper delegation system in place.
  • I have to constantly put out fires (in a figurative sense) – this constantly disrupts my life, and I frequently have cancelled family & friend obligations to fix a crashed server or resolve another technical problem.
Advice:
  • Read everything you can get your hands on about website management, delegation, and other related subject areas.
  • Get your life in order. Get on a schedule that will keep you level headed, even when an influx of responsibilities swarm in. For example, set a daily time to exercise, go to bed at the same time every day, and take some time before bed to relax.
  • Don’t neglect your health for the sake of your website. Regardless of anything that is going on, make sure you eat well, exercise, get enough sleep, and work to maintain your relationships with your friends, significant other, and family.
  • Focus on the static base-content before anything else. This includes your homepage, value proposition, about page, etc. Clearly define what your brand is and your intentions are.
  • Next focus on building a strong content base. This should be stuff that you can reference back to in future posts, when you get questions, etc.
  • Develop a strong FAQ to refer inquiring users to. Do not worry about one on one interaction. This will be the nail in your coffin. Send a nice, general response that you send to everybody (preferably linking to your FAQ), and if you see the same question coming in over and over, add it to your FAQ.
  • Once you start getting traffic, listen to what people are saying. Do a reader survey to respond to your reader’s needs. You don’t need to do exactly what they say, but don’t go against the current completely. Keep control of your ship but let the current lead you into prosperity.
  • Get a virtual assistant early and set up a good delegation system. Get this done as soon as you can afford it because it can take months to establish a seamless system.
  • Set your site up on a scaleable cloud hosting service, so you can quickly and easily increase server resources without dealing with switching the DNS settings.
  • Don’t expect any attention for at least a year. Focus on developing something worth talking about. Don’t even look at your traffic – it doesn’t matter.
  • Don’t worry about marketing, SEO, etc. Seriously, stop it all entirely. If you develop good enough content, people will come. I am 100% sure about this. I spent a month writing another really cool website and didn’t market it at all…. I noticed on Google Analytics that I got 45,000+ unique visitors in one day after one person found it, liked it, and shared it on a social networking website. Let word-of-mouth do the marketing for you, at least in the beginning stages of your website.
  • Set up a regular posting schedule early. Be really consistent, but not so often that it takes away from quality. Choose only one medium for now – no need to have a podcast, video series, and blog when you are just starting out. I would recommend committing to one article/blog post/video/whatever you do per week and sticking to it, through the thick and thin. Load up a month of content in advance, just in case something happens in your life that requires your attention.
I don’t mean to rant, I am very thankful for the dozens of volunteers that help me keep my website and web community running smoothly. Without them, I would have definitely collapsed of stress by now.
If you take anything out of this write-up, just consider scale-ability while building your platform. Think big picture – will this method of doing things still work if I had a million unique visitors per month? If not, figure out a method that will work better.
-Anonymous
(Owner of a website that now gets over a million unique visitors a month, but is struggling to maintain it.)

10. October 2014 by Anonymous
Categories: Blogging Tips, Internet, Setting Your Goals, Website Construction | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

CyanogenMod won’t update after encryption!

I ran into this problem after encrypting my device. I plan on selling the phone after I buy a new one and wanted to make sure my personal information had the best chance of staying personal.

CyanogenMod Won’t Update! (after encryption)

Step one:cyanogenmod won't update after encryption

Download the CyanogenMod update you would like to install (settings > About Phone > CyanogenMod updates). When the download is complete chose to not install directly from the pop up.

Step two:

Then use a file transfer program to move the download to your external SD or an SD partition that is not encrypted.

Step three:

After the file has moved, boot to recovery and install the update just as a you would new ROM (without wiping cache and personal data).

Step 4:

cyanogenmod wont updateAfter the install is finished reboot the device and navigate to the CyanogenMod updater. It should show you that you are running the update you installed manually.

It’s extra work to update but at least we can still update. If you have any questions please ask them in the comments below.

04. September 2014 by Jaron
Categories: Android, CyanogenMod, Operating Systems, Root, Technology | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Should I Switch to T-Mobile?

I have been contemplating this on and off for months. So I decided to ask the people who have the service what that think over on Google+ and I have gotten a large response of opinions.

To see the comments from T-Mobile customers click the G+ Comment Icon button.

Should I switch to T-Mobile?

The answer is looking like, yes; as long as there is decent coverage for your everyday day travel.

If you have switched from Verizon to T-Mobile please leave a comment below telling your experience.

06. August 2014 by Jaron
Categories: Technology | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

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